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That Hip Pain Could Actually Be a Sciatica Problem

Living a sedentary lifestyle or carrying a heavy load when you aren’t in good physical shape can lead to hip pain. However, if your pain doesn't go away after rest, you could be suffering from sciatica.

Although many underlying conditions can cause hip pain, sciatica is one of the most common causes because it’s triggered by many other conditions. For example, type 2 diabetes damages the sciatic nerve. Other risk factors for sciatica include obesity, spinal tumors, infections, and the narrowing of the spinal cord.  

Sciatica occurs when the sciatic nerve, which branches from your lower back to your legs, becomes irritated or compressed. 

Want to find out if sciatica is the cause of your hip pain? Below, our team of experts at Bahri Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Clinic, P.L. share the most common symptoms of sciatica, explain how the condition is diagnosed, and reveal what treatment options are available.

Radiating lower back pain 

A common symptom of sciatica is lower back pain that goes all the way from your hip to your buttocks and leg. Sciatica pain ranges from mild to sharp, and many patients describe it as an electrical jolt.

Sciatica usually impacts only one leg, and it may worsen when you make sudden movements, sit down, or sneeze. 

Numbness and weakness in one leg and foot

Numbness that comes and goes is normal, especially if you sit in an uncomfortable position for an extended period. However, persistent numbness can be a sign of an irritated or compressed sciatic nerve.

Loss of bowel or bladder function

Cauda equina syndrome (CES) is a serious complication of sciatica that involves radiating hip pain accompanied by loss of bowel or bladder function. 

If you experience the symptoms mentioned above, contact a medical professional right away. CES is a medical emergency, and it can lead to permanent neurological and physical damage if left untreated. 

Diagnosis and treatment for hip pain 

If you aren’t sure what’s causing your chronic hip pain, our specialists at Bahri Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Clinic can help you by providing ultrasounds, X-rays, MRIs, blood tests, and urine tests. We’ll also perform a physical exam and review your medical history.

Hip pain treatment isn’t one-size-fits-all, so your treatment will be personalized depending on your risk factors and comorbidities (the presence of two or more chronic conditions), and the severity of your symptoms. Your treatment plan may include physical therapy, medications, and a few lifestyle tweaks. Severe cases may also require surgery.

Sick of dealing with hip pain? Contact us to schedule an appointment at one of our offices in Jacksonville, Florida.

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